My View of the Landscape

Hey folks,

Keep your eyes fixed on our website for articles the conventional media has chosen not to publish related to farming in America; another part of our economy in big trouble.  I’ve been writing about these problems over the last five years with very limited success getting anything published in the popularist press.  You know, it has to conform to an accepted genre; farming is boring… kind of like watching an iceberg melt.   So, I’m trying a less conventional path to get the word out; we are in deep stuff.  The plight of farming in America goes to the heart of one of our most fundamental needs: what we put in our bodies.  

Mike Broadhurst, Dragon Spring Farm

Blues are back!

We began to pick blueberries two weeks ago and now have sufficient quantity to supply orders.  The quality of the fruit is very good, although the size to this point is average.  Early blueberries from California’s Central Coast are among the best available; nothing like what you find in supermarkets or those big box stores.  We were fortunate to avoid damage to our fruit from April’s late frost, unlike most of our competitors.  So, get those orders in.  We guarantee you will not be disappointed. 

We have sold out of greenskin avocados for the season to local outlets, but will begin to pick Haas shortly and will be able to supply internet orders this year.

More on Avocados

We have decided to wait until October to begin to pick our Haas avocados.  The crop is small this year and by October the oil content will be very high, giving the fruit more of that rich, nutty flavor.  Try our avocados; you will never buy them at the supermarket again.

Next Up – Avocados

It’s the end of July and we are pruning blueberries, necessary to ensure a great crop in 2008; so we will no longer be able to ship berries.  But the end of the berry season marks the beginning of avocados.  Due to fruit drop from the January freeze, we have sold out of Zutanos but plan to begin to pick Hass in September.  Relatively fortunate compared to most California growers, we only lost about half our Haas fruit to the freeze.  Many growers not only lost the 2007 crop but the flower buds so that no fruit was set for next year.  As a consequence, both 2007 and 2008 will experience a lack of local avocados.

We are fortunate that a majority of our trees were planted upslope from the coldest temperatures and the fruit survived.  Still the stems froze in colder areas and the fruit dropped about two weeks after the freeze.  Nonetheless, we will have plenty of avocados on offer in September.  Get your orders in now.  The size and quality of the fruit will be very high, and it will be ready to eat a few days after arrival.  

Berries are Here!

Thanks for your patience. Here we are in June with bountiful blueberries. Although late because of January’s devastating frost, the berries are bigger, sweeter and more flavorful than ever. We remain hopeful for a prolonged picking season; maybe well into August.

We are hopeful that readers will support our efforts to bring real food to the Internet, not the tart, tastless things you have become used to from you supermarket. When fully ripe, freshly picked blueberries ship well, and you may be surprised when you open the package. Try Dragon Spring Farms fresh blueberries for an atypical culinary experience. You won’t be disappointed.

Welcome to Dragon Spring Farms first blog.

Welcome to Dragon Spring Farms first blog. We saw our first ripe blueberries of the season today. This is encouraging because we had a hard winter and would normally be offering blueberries for sell by this time. As expected, the first ripe berries were on Mistys that we mostly grow as pollinators. If things follow the usual pattern in this unusual year, we will begin picking our main crop berries from Sharpblues and Jewels by the middle of next month and will be able to fill orders.

We were not exempted from damage due to January’s hard freeze, along with most of our neighbors on California’s central coast. Temperatures were below freezing every night for over a week with lowest temperatures in the middle teens near the creek where we grow the berries.

We lost our entire early crop of berries and about half our avocado crop. Fortunately, the avos higher on the hill did not drop their fruit. Nonetheless, this is the first year we have seen the berries leafless; they are typically evergreen in this area. So things started over again in early February.

Since this has been an abnormal winter, we are in uncharted territory. Our hope is that the energy not used for early fruit will extend the season for the berries well into July or perhaps August. We will begin to offer avocados around the first of September, but it may be a light year because of the fruit drop. However, many local growers and those as far south as San Diego lost their entire crop, so we were lucky.

This is Dragon Spring Farm’s first blog. We will provide regular updates.